Portraits

One Minute Tip #5: Dealing with Glasses

People who wear glasses are faced with the decision of, "should I wear my glasses for my head shot or portrait session?" As a Tampa, FL based photographer, I admit, it can be a challenge to photograph clients with glasses. The primary issue is the reflection or glare glasses produce when the light hits them. It's helpful if you buy corrective lenses with anti-glare. Another option is to have a pair of frames with no lenses. I wouldn't buy a pair of frames, instead, ask your optometrist to borrow a pair for the day. 

It took some study and practice, but I learned how to completely avoid the reflection or glare that lenses produce. With that being said, if people recognize you with your glasses then my suggestion is to wear them for your head shot or portrait session. Plus, you want to look authentic in your head shot and if family, friends, and business associates are used to seeing you with glasses on, you should wear them.

Deep Ellum Pop Up Photography Studio

Last weekend, I photographed a High School Senior portrait session in Deep Ellum, which is east of downtown Dallas. In preparation for this outdoor shoot, I added a speed light to my kit, a Yongnu YN-568EX for Nikon. I selected this flash as it supports TTL and High Speed Sync and much cheaper than the Nikon flashes. I added this flash because I wanted four units that supported TTL and High Speed Sync. My plan was to use all four simultaneously. In addition, I added a Cowboy Studio 4 way flash shoe bracket, so that I can mount all 4 speed lights on to one bracket. 

It was an overcast day, so there was no harsh sunlight. My plan was to balance the ambient light, which was diffused by the clouds and off camera flash. I used this setup for the senior portraits and they turned out great. The portrait session lasted about an hour, so I decided to find a location and take some stranger portraits while I was down there. 

I end up shooting in mostly in one locations, the first spot didn't have much foot traffic, so I only ended up getting one stranger portrait, but it was probably the most interesting. After about 20 minutes, I moved around the corner, found something with a cool background and waited for strangers to pass.

I'd heard of other photographers do this, finding a location on the street and basically setting up a pop up studio, it was a cool experience and I look forward to do this again.